(via skyyyisthelimittt)

6 minutes ago 303,451 notes
*watches a movie*
*sees a dog*
me: if something happens to that dog I sWEAR TO GOD
38 minutes ago 61,578 notes

drythroats:

Gogo Sucide.

39 minutes ago 92 notes

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39 minutes ago 21,832 notes

empty-spaces:

There, There || The Wonder Years 

(via panda-witch)

39 minutes ago 15,021 notes

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40 minutes ago 258,612 notes

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40 minutes ago 17,969 notes

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40 minutes ago 10,237 notes

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40 minutes ago 5,285 notes
20th
October
5,278 notes
Reblog

(via kittenofsouls)

44 minutes ago 5,278 notes

kiss-mythirdeye:

julysage:

West.

🌸

(via klondikebar)

47 minutes ago 184 notes

It’s okay to not be okay.

49 minutes ago 3 notes

asmilinggoddess:

asmilinggoddess:

now that im in the space mood i’d like to remind each and every one of you that NASA drew a dick on mars. we drew a dick on another planet.  that is mankind’s legacy.

image

THIS IS AN ACTUAL PHOTO OF THE SURFACE OF MARS. PLEASE NEVER FORGET THIS.

(via klondikebar)

49 minutes ago 42,090 notes

child-of-thecosmos:

On Mercury’s double sunrises:

Mercury possesses the most eccentric orbit of any planet. It rotates on its axis three times for every two revolutions it makes around the Sun. But when it arrives at perihelion (its closest to the Sun) Mercury’s orbital velocity will exceed its rotational speed. As a consequence, a hypothetical observer standing on Mercury would see a sight unique in our entire solar system. Over the course of eight days (fours days before perihelion to four days after perihelion), the Sun would appear to reverse its course across the sky, then double back and resume its normal track across the sky.

If our observer were located on that part of Mercury where the Sun were to rise around the time of perihelion, the Sun would appear to partially come up above the eastern horizon, pause and then drop back below the horizon, followed in rapid succession by a second sunrise!

[View the double sunrise animation here]

The third GIF shows Mercury’s orbit around the Sun. Viewed from the Sun, Mercury exhibits a peculiar motion. Its spin & elliptical orbit are synchronised, so it appears to stop rotating every time it reaches perihelion.

On why only two spacecrafts have visited the innermost planet

Compared to other planets, Mercury is difficult to explore. The increased speed required to reach it is relatively high, and due to the proximity to the Sun, orbits around it are rather unstable.

A trip to Mercury requires more rocket fuel than that required to escape the Solar System completely. As a result, only two space probes have visited the planet so far.

Sources: T0R0YD on YouTube, Space.com Space Facts, SkyMarvels, Wikipedia

49 minutes ago 32 notes

galaxiesand-weeds:

nubbsgalore:

wyoming’s grand teton mountains, photographed by glen hush

zujii

(via nothingnothingnothingatall)

1 hour ago 3,857 notes